This morning's planetary grouping

posted: 2294 days ago, on Wednesday, 2011 May 11 at 10:36
tags: astronomy, astrophotography, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Kos Coronaios.

The brightest planets in our solar system are having a close encounter in the morning sky. Kos Coronaios is on stand-by to image the group.

Tuesday, May 31

The crescent Moon and four bright planets imaged this morning by Herman Schumacher from Vereeniging.

Image by Herman Schumacher

Monday, May 30

Moon and planets imaged this morning by Herman Schumacher and Kos Coronaios.

Image by Herman Schumacher

Image by Kos Coronaios

Sunday, May 29

Over the past two weeks or so, the four bright planets Jupiter, Venus, Mercury and Mars have been visible in the morning sky. Kos Coronaios has been imaging the gathering. Scroll down to see images from earlier on.

Kos writes: "Just look at the difference! Jupiter has moved over 10 degrees away from Venus as Mars has finally caught up to the bright planet (just over 1 degree away), and Mercury of course now starts sinking towards the horizon."

Image by Kos Coronaios

Monday, May 23

Over the past two weeks or so, the four bright planets Jupiter, Venus, Mercury and Mars have been visible in the morning sky. Kos Coronaios has been imaging the gathering. Scroll down to see images from earlier on.

Kos writes: "Just look at the difference! Jupiter has moved over 10 degrees away from Venus as Mars has finally caught up to the bright planet (just over 1 degree away), and Mercury of course now starts sinking towards the horizon."

Image by Kos Coronaios

Saturday, May 14

This morning's image shows the four bright planets Jupiter, Venus, Mercury and Mars; scroll down to see how rapidly the configuration has changed over the past few days.

A special thanks to Kos for the lovely series of images.

P.S. Also seen on spaceweather.com!

Image by Kos Coronaios

Friday, May 13

This morning's image shows the four bright planets Jupiter, Venus, Mercury and Mars, lurking together above the eastern horizon before daybreak. Scroll down to see the planets yesterday and on Wednesday.

The uppermost trio are (left to right) Jupiter, Venus and Mercury. Directly below Venus (the brightest "star") is a real star - omicron Piscium - while lower down, just above the tree-line, lies Mars.

In terms of magnitudes, we have Venus = -3.8, Jupiter = -1.9, Mercury = +0.3 and Mars = +1.3. In terms of relative brightness, Venus is six times brighter than Jupiter, and 108 times brighter than Mars!

Image by Kos Coronaios

Thursday, May 12

The brightest planets in our solar system gathered this morning (May 12) for a close encounter, as the image by Kos Coronaios shows.

Visible in the upper right-hand corner of the image and (left to right) Jupiter, Venus, and Mercury. Venus is the brightest of the trio.

Scroll down for the image taken yesterday morning and compare how much the planets have moved.

Image by Kos Coronaios

Wednesday, May 11

Visible in the upper right-hand corner of the image and (left to right) Jupiter, Venus, and Mercury. Venus is the brightest of the trio.

Jupiter and Venus were just 0.7 apart, while Venus and Mercury stretched 1.5 of sky between them.

If you missed this morning's grouping, take a look tomorrow (Thursday, May 12) for a similar arrangement of planets. After Thursday, the two inner planets hectic circumsolar race carry them further away from Jupiter in the sky -- by Sunday morning Jupiter and Venus will be over 3.5 apart.

Image by Kos Coronaios

nothing more to see. please move along.